News from the Hickory Corner Community of Chester County

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with Dot Patterson

Greetings from Hickory Corner!
My son Terry and his wife Jo are visiting from Illinois. Terry was just down a few weeks ago, but they wanted to come back to check on me. They have been staying at home as well. I am glad they are here. I ate dinner with them tonight, and it was a blessing to have a little bit of normalcy.
I spotted Walt and Ann Bennett’s grandson Triston walking down the lane in front of my house and was able to chat with him for a few minutes (at a distance of course). I sent him home with banana nut muffins for himself and some to share with Walt and Ann.
Almost 20 years ago, I gave a book to my son-in-law at Christmas. A few weeks ago, my daughter sent the book back to me, knowing that I had plenty of time to read and thought I would enjoy it. I have just finished reading The Greatest Generation Speaks by Tom Brokaw. It is a collection of stories from men and women of the World War II generation. This is a tribute to all the soldiers who served in the war during that time. I have heard it said that you can travel anywhere in the world by a reading a book (just maybe so). While reading this book, I have been many places during World War II: on the battlefield, on fighter planes with young brave pilots flying the P38, in the dugouts, on the beach and in the foxholes. All war is bad, and this book certainly proves it. If you have time, I recommend you read this book.
What did soldiers eat? Spam. One hundred thirty three million cans of Spam fed soldiers and civilians overseas from 1940-1945. American GIs ate so much of it their mess hall joked it was a meatball without basic training. American Allies in WWII credited spam with saving their bacon. The Russians called it Roosevelt’s sausage. Soviet Leader Nikita Khrushchev once wrote, “Without spam, we wouldn’t be able to feed our army.” Spam fed soldiers through World War I, World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War and the Persian War. (Reminisce Magazine)
My James served during the Korean conflict. After he came home, he had lost a lot of weight and was n0t feeling well. We moved back to Illinois where he saw a doctor and was treated for Malaria. I remember making Spam for dinner as I would coat it with a little flour and fry it. After a few times, James kindly asked me not to cook it again. I guess he had too much of it while overseas.
Remember in prayer those on our prayer list: Arlan Porter, Walt and Ann Bennett, Richy Butler, Ronnie and Ladelle Clark, Mildred Smith, Mary Alice and Martha Autry, Ann Morrison, Bonice Martin, Peggy Whitman, Jim Ruth, W.T Roland, Peggy Lard, William Maness, Buck Burkhead, and all the caregivers.
Continue to pray for military serving all over the world and all leaders of our country.
Also pray and give thanks for our healthcare workers and all essential workers.
I need to hear from readers. Call me at 989-3315 with any tidbits you would like to share. It is difficult to write this column without you. Please call me with some news.
“I think when the dust settles, we will realize how little we need, how much we actually have and the true value of human connection.” – (unknown).
Make it a great week!